• Angie

Body & Skin Care Guide



When looking to live a cleaner and healthier life, the top priority is often buying clean and/or organic foods and non-toxic cleaning options. Though often overlooked is our body and skincare products, despite them arguably being one of the most dangerous sources of toxins.


Body care products such as cosmetics, moisturizers, soaps, and beauty products are poured on, rubbed in, left to sit, and sometimes soaked onto and into our skin – the largest organ of the body! This is wonderful when applying nourishing, moisturizing, or healing ingredients to our skin. In the case of toxic, hormone-disrupting chemicals in body care products, this is horrible and detrimental to our health!


And even if you are looking for nontoxic or natural body products, many companies tout that they are "natural" on their labels. Still, a quick look at an ingredients list with an informed eye reveals the truth: ingredients that are anything but natural or safe.


CHEMICALS TO STAY AWAY FROM

Instead of stressing and trying to weed through label nightmares, we can learn some basics to watch out for and resources to turn to when in doubt. Some quick ingredients to learn and avoid in body care products include (but are certainly not limited to):

  • Parabens – spotted as a suffix (e.g., ethylparaben) and can indicate hormone-disrupting effects linked with cancer and a shift in natural puberty patterns, among other issues.

  • Phthalates – used pervasively in body care ingredients and packaging, phthalates are a concern for allergies, asthma, reproductive health, and more.

  • Formaldehyde – used as a preservative but is a known carcinogen and neurotoxin.

  • Triclosan – an antibacterial staple, triclosan can affect the liver and thyroid, among other concerns.

  • Fragrance – a catch-all term that can hide dangerous toxins.


To boil this down to the simplest for the safety of body care products, remember that what goes on your skin often makes it into the body, especially if it’s a leave-on product. So my motto is, if you wouldn’t eat it, don’t apply it! You might not want to eat a safe and natural lotion bar or bar of soap, but this “rule” is still a good way to remember that skincare is far more than skin deep. If you are feeling adventurous, I highly suggest trying out making some DIY body products yourself. And keep an eye out; we will also be sharing some recipes with you to try.


If you do not have the time or are just not into crafting your own products, we and many other small businesses do make "for real" natural and handcrafted body and skincare products. You can check out Lavender & Honey's here. You will see all of our products are simple, pure, and safe. Each of our products are handcrafted with natural ingredients in their purest form. There is no long list filled with unrecognizable substances that you have no idea of or how to pronounce.


I also would like to share two of my favorite resources for keeping chemical-slinging companies in check: the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the Think Dirty App.

The EWG is an American activist group specializing in research and advocacy in agricultural subsidies, toxic chemicals, drinking water pollutants, and corporate accountability. The Environmental Working Group's mission is to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. With breakthrough research and education, we drive consumer choice and civic action. They are a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. Their website covers news, key issues, research, consumer guides, and much more.


The Think Dirty app is a free app that educates users on potential toxins in the household, personal care, and beauty products. Just scan the product barcode, and Think Dirty will give you easy-to-understand info on the product, track dirty ingredients and shop for cleaner options.


Disclaimer:

All products on lavendernhoney.com are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Products and statements have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and therefore are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any medical condition. The information contained on this site is for educational purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or other healthcare professional.

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